Rise in “DIY probate” is stoking risk of tax avoidance and fraud

Print This Post

17 August 2010


The growing trend for relatives to do their own probate is increasing the risk of tax fraud and the incorrect distribution of assets, a specialist probate research company has warned

3 Responses to “Rise in “DIY probate” is stoking risk of tax avoidance and fraud”

  1. Is this evidence of the market reacting to perceived lack of trust & value of current service offering?

  2. Andrew Neligan on August 17th, 2010 at 9:55 pm
  3. How many firms doing probate work offer to do it on a fixed fee or a contingency? Predictability might make a significant difference to the willingness to instruct??

  4. Richard Moorhead on August 18th, 2010 at 9:49 am
  5. I am a trusts and estates practitioner. My field relies heavily on the prompt establishment of a strong solicitor- client relationship. Probates rarely deal with just administration but also tax mitigation, as well the emotional impact on the family. The current financial climate will encourage individuals to do it themselves but the standard imposed by the probate registry and HMRC are the same. Untrained executors will make mistakes. However with new HMRC penalty regulations in force those mistakes will be even costlier. Probate is one of the few areas that has not attracted client complaints against solicitors. The complexity of the speciality does not make it a natural fixed fee service; as it is only after detailed investigation do many of the contentious issues arise.

  6. Sarah Austin on August 24th, 2010 at 10:17 am

Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

Inbound marketing for law firms – For those about to flock

Chris Davidson Moore LT

Written in honour of Malcolm Young, recently deceased founding member of AC/DC, there are nine references to AC/DC songs throughout this article. We will send a £20 iTunes voucher to the first person who gets in touch to tell us what they are. The forces that are driving change in the legal profession are wide and varied. The ability of law firms and individual solicitors to respond positively and innovatively to these challenges will determine who survives and prospers. Competition for new business is fierce, a dog eat dog world, one might say. Which brings us to AC/CD. Not my favourite rock band, but an acronym for Attract, Convert, Close and Delight – the four pillars of inbound marketing.

December 13th, 2017