Private Client


Free wills “as profitable as charging a few hundred pounds”

17 June 2021

Law firms can make as much money by providing their clients with free wills and charging for additional services than by charging a few hundred pounds for a will.


Life management business takes holistic approach to divorce and bereavement

15 June 2021

A “boutique life management service” is aiming to reduce the stress of divorce and bereavement by providing a holistic service including legal and financial advice.


Immigration and civil litigation hit hardest by Covid-19

5 May 2021

Immigration and civil litigation were the two areas of legal practice hit hardest by the pandemic last year, with private client and family law “insulated” from the impact, new research has found.


Solicitor who submitted false oath agrees to leave profession

5 March 2021

A former partner at a Yorkshire law firm who submitted a false statement to the probate court as part of the oath for executors has agreed to leave the profession.


Personal insolvency verses matrimonial law

3 March 2021

It is fair to say that there has, for many years, been a “difference of opinion” between the law governing personal insolvency and matrimonial law with each “side” believing that they are right and should take precedence. The principal, sometimes conflicting, legislation is covered in the Insolvency Act 1986 and the Matrimonial Causes Act 1973. However, the differing courts can and will give wide discretion when determining whether and how a married couple’s assets are to be divided.


Consumers willing to work with wills and probate solicitors online

15 December 2020

More than a third of consumers believe that video witnessing of wills is “a good alternative” to being there in person, according to a major study, while a majority are happy to have an online consultation.


Solicitor ordered secretaries to retrospectively “witness” wills

4 December 2020

The managing director of a law firm who ordered legal secretaries and a trainee solicitor to retrospectively “witness” wills which had already been signed by clients has been struck off.


Solicitors oppose move to digital signatures for LPAs

16 November 2020

The vast majority of solicitors want to retain the rule that donors must physically sign lasting powers of attorney (LPAs) rather than move to electronic signatures, a survey has found.


Lockdown triggers surge in searches for DIY wills

13 November 2020

Google searches for DIY wills surged by more than 15 times in the week leading up to the second national lockdown, while probate specialists have blamed institutions for delays in the process.


Lost wills: What to do when the original will cannot be found

11 November 2020

Personal representatives tasked with dealing with a deceased person’s affairs are often faced with a number of challenges, both legal and practical. Sometimes these challenges can be complex and involve dealing with contested wills.


Court: “No need for City lawyer” in professional executor tussle

4 November 2020

There was no need for a more expensive City lawyer to be appointed a professional executor in preference to one from the Home Counties in a straightforward probate, the High Court has ruled.


Funeral and burial disputes

30 October 2020

It’s not uncommon for disagreements to arise between family members and loved ones over funeral arrangements, burial disputes or possession of ashes. So, who has the ultimate say and what can you do? Richard Adams, senior associate in the Contested Wills, Trusts and Estates team at Hugh James who has advised clients in a number of such cases, considers this delicate and sensitive issue.


LSB “forced” accountants to withdraw from legal services regulation

15 October 2020

It was “fundamentally wrong” for Legal Services Board rules to force the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants to withdraw from legal services, another accountancy body has argued.


Larke v Nugus requests – the cornerstone of will disputes?

12 October 2020

A request for a Larke v Nugus statement is often considered a preliminary step when there is an intention to contest a will. But what happened in that case and what effect does it have on cases which involve probate disputes in the modern day?


MoJ: “Time has come” to mandate online probate applications

1 October 2020

The “time has come” for solicitors and other professional users to apply for the vast majority of grants of probate online – but not yet letters of administration – the government said yesterday.

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Blog


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