Three-way merger creates top-200 ABS


Jaggard: more efficient ways of working and communicating

Jaggard: more efficient ways of working and communicating

A three-way merger into a new alternative business structure has created a top 200 law firm, Legal Futures can reveal.

The ABS, Taylor Rose TTKW, is made up of Peterborough-headquartered Taylor Rose Law, its associated costs firm Jaggards, and London firm Tucker Turner Kingsley Wood.

The new law firm comprises 16 partners, around 300 employees and seven offices across England. Jaggards, a well-known name for defendant costs work, has now ceased trading.

The licence allows Michael Webb OBE, who has been a non-executive director of Jaggards, to continue the role in the new holding company board.

The firm said it also wanted to lay the foundations for possible external investment in the future, although at this stage no steps have been taken towards achieving that.

Taylor Rose Law was originally founded in 2004 as McCullough & Co, a specialist legal costs firm. In 2009 the firm took on its current name and status, and began moving into other areas of law and growing in scale, also creating its own online legal document service last year.

Tucker Turner Kinsgley Wood is a 10-partner firm that specialises in property law, and also offers a range of other services.

In a statement, the firm said: “This merger is driven by common core values, not least a will to consistently improve. By bringing together three independently successful firms, available resources for re-investment will again increase in areas such as training, compliance and technology. All three firms already hold strong relationships with larger national and international clients.

Managing director Adrian Jaggard added: “Our services will continue to be noticeably different from others. We will still innovate, offering legal advice and support in completely different ways to others. We will continue to invest in our proprietary suite of over 100 purely online legal services, as well as develop more efficient ways of working and communicating with our clients.”

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