TAG solicitor loses appeal against striking-off

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By Legal Futures

4 April 2012


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jpg” alt=”” width=”186″ height=”300″ /> Court of Appeal: High Court’s ruling was entirely justified

A solicitor heavily involved with failed claims handler The Accident Group (TAG) has lost his appeal against a High Court decision to strike him off

Anthony Dennison, who was a partner at Rowe Cohen, the Manchester law firm that vetted personal injury claims for TAG – which collapsed in 2003 owing £100 million – had initially been fined £23,500 by the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT)

Most of the fine was for dishonestly concealing his part-ownership of Legal Report Services (LRS), a company that supplied medical reports for clients for whom Rowe Cohen acted under the TAG scheme – a deal he arranged

The SDT declined to strike him off or suspend him, on the grounds that several years had passed since the events at issue, Mr Dennison had already made payments of £400,000 to his former partners, and no member of the public would be at risk if he continued in practice

Unusually, the Solicitors Regulatory Authority (SRA) appealed, arguing that striking off was appropriate and last year , ,



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