SRA shuts Manchester firm – four months after banning director from conveyancing


SRA: Conveyancing ban imposed in August

SRA: Conveyancing ban imposed in August

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) has closed down a Manchester law firm, more than four months after banning its director from conveyancing and ordering him to go on a mortgage fraud and money laundering course.

The SRA imposed conditions on the practising certificate of Glyn Alan Willmott, director of Stirling Law Limited based in the city centre, at the beginning of August last year.

The first was that he “may not undertake any form of conveyancing work and is not responsible for any fee-earner undertaking such work”.

The second condition was that Mr Willmott undertook a “course on mortgage fraud and money-laundering within three months of the decision” and provided confirmation that he had completed the course before applying for his next PC.

The SRA intervened into Stirling Law the week before Christmas. Among the grounds for the intervention in the practice were that there was “reason to suspect dishonesty on the part of Mr Glyn Willmott”.

Stirling Law’s website was up and running yesterday, and Legal Futures was able to leave a message for Mr Willmott to contact us, which he is yet to do.

On the website, the firm describes itself as a “modern, customer-facing law firm capable of dealing with all of your legal requirements – regardless of size, scale or complexity”.

The sites goes on: “Our expert solicitors have a wealth of experience of dealing with commercial and corporate law issues across many types of industries and sectors.”

Among these are commercial property, business sales and purchases, commercial litigation, landlord and tenant, and insolvency and bankruptcy.

The website lists residential conveyancing as one of the services the firm provides, but, when you click on it, only a blank page appears.

Gordons in Bradford have been appointed intervention agents.

 

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