Riverview unveils technology behind ‘virtual assistants’


Karl Chapman

Chapman: technology “applicable to all sectors”

Riverview Law has unveiled the technology which it will use to power a range of legal ‘virtual assistants’ it is preparing to launch next year.

Known as ‘Kim’, the technology combines the CliXLEX platform, which Riverview Law acquired in August, with the output from its R&D unit and other technologies the firm has invested in.

A spokeswoman for Riverview said the firm worked with CliXLEX for a year before acquiring the company, and the latest developments build on its partnership with the University of Liverpool to develop artificial intelligence and related expertise.

She said the Kim technology was applicable to all sectors and already being used outside the legal market.

In addition to licensing its technology to third parties Kim, which stands for ‘knowledge, intelligence, meaning’, will launch its own products in certain areas.

“The Riverview Law virtual assistants are designed to help legal teams make quicker and better decisions,” she said. “They will be able to take on many tasks for lawyers, combining Riverview Law’s legal domain expertise with automation, expert systems, reporting, visualisations and artificial intelligence.”

The spokeswoman said that following extensive R&D, beta-testing and planning, the first virtual assistants would be launched at a London press conference early in 2016, with more released throughout the year.

“They are aimed at all businesses that have an in-house function and will be available globally, including to other law firms.

“When these virtual assistants are launched, Riverview Law will have a comprehensive suite of technology solutions that range from tailored applications for global organisations on an enterprise-wide basis through to off-the-shelf, quick to launch, pre-configured tools for in-house teams.”

Karl Chapman, chief executive of Riverview Law, said: “Because the Kim technology is applicable to all sectors, we are running this subsidiary as if it is a stand-alone business.

“In this context Riverview Law licenses the Kim technology on an arms-length basis and exploits it in the legal market, which is our domain expertise.

“During 2016 we will review the best way in which we can ensure that Kim fulfils its potential, globally, while ensuring that the Riverview Law board remains focused on delivering solutions for the fast-changing legal market.

“Most businesses are, or are becoming, technology-led. Riverview Law is no exception. We handle thousands of legal matters every year for global corporations, mid-sized and fast-growing businesses.”

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