Mayson: UCL alumnus

University College London has scored a major coup by attracting Professor Stephen Mayson to join as an honorary professor in law.

Previously head of the University of Law’s Legal Services Institute, he will be attached to the Centre for Ethics and Law at UCL’s Faculty of Laws.

Professor Mayson will contribute to the centre’s engagement with the professions, policymakers and academics around ethics and professional regulation through its regular seminars and think tanks, as well as through papers and research.

He has a long-standing intellectual and professional interest in the governance of law firms and legal services, particularly leading public debate on issues arising from the Legal Services Act. His work on reserved legal activities has framed the ongoing debate on reform in the area.

Among several other appointments, he is a non-executive director of two alternative business structures – DAS and Tees Law – as well as of law firms Ince & Co and Brachers. He retains his role as professor of legal services regulation at the University of Law.

Professor Richard Moorhead, director of the Centre for Ethics and Law, said: “Stephen brings a wealth of experience of practice, corporate and professional governance, and its regulation.

“He has been bringing clarity and wisdom to professional service debates for many years and his work on the Legal Services Act has been extremely influential and insightful.”

Professor Mayson said: “It’s an honour to join the UCL Faculty of Laws. As an alumnus, it is particularly gratifying to be returning in a new capacity. I look forward to working with other members of the distinguished faculty in pursuing my interest in legal services regulation and ethics.”

He was called to the Bar in 1977, and was for a time a tax lawyer with Clifford-Turner, as it then was. He became one of the first UK specialist consultants to law firms in 1985, since when he has acted as a strategic adviser to hundreds of law firms.



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