Former diplomat becomes chair of IPS as Bradley leaves CLC


Quinton Quayle

Quayle: IPS moving into “exciting new period”

Quinton Quayle, a former British ambassador to Thailand, has been appointed chair of ILEX Professional Standards (IPS).

Meanwhile, the Council for Licensed Conveyancers (CLC) has announced that Anna Bradley is stepping down as chair after five years.

Mr Quayle, a member of the Queen’s Counsel appointments panel, will replace Alan Kershaw on 1 June.

Since retiring from the diplomatic service, he has specialised in regulation, sitting on the governing council of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland and the regulation board of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

Frances Edwards, president of the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx), said: “The regulatory landscape has been changing fast in recent years, and CILEx members have been at the forefront of outcomes-focused regulation and a fresh approach to CPD.

“Many more changes are to come, and I have no doubt both CILEx members and IPS will benefit from Quinton’s experience and expertise.”

Mr Quayle said IPS was moving into an “exciting new period” in its development having “chalked up some impressive achievements under Alan Kershaw, who has chaired the board with distinction over the past seven years.”

Mr Quayle, a member of the HS2 Exceptional Hardship Panel, regularly travels to South East Asia where he acts as adviser to large corporations such as Prudential and De La Rue.

He will be the second former British ambassador to lead a legal regulator, with Sir Andrew Burns holding his first meeting as chair of the Bar Standards Board last week.

Meanwhile, a spokesman for the CLC said recruitment of a new chair would begin next week.

“Anna’s work with the council and staff over the past five years leaves the CLC with a clear strategy focused on the strengths of its specialisation in property law,” he said.

“The CLC is currently a regulator of conveyancing and probate services as well as other closely allied non-reserved legal services such as will-writing. Thirty years after its foundation, the CLC’s strategy is to build on the expertise it has in these fields and which has delivered high levels of consumer protection while fostering innovation and growth in the provision of legal services.

“CLC-regulated firms have out-performed the market after 2007 and during the recovery. “

The spokesman added that Sheila Kumar, chief executive of the CLC, was reorganising the senior management team and reducing the number of directors from five to three.

Ms Kumar said the work Ms Bradley has led “to settle a new and focused strategy for us as a specialist regulator gives us a clear direction, building on our achievements in the regulation of property law.

“We are now working to ensure that we have in place the right people and tools to deliver that strategy without increasing the financial burden on the regulated community.”

Both Alan Kershaw and Anna Bradley are taking part in Legal Futures‘ inaugural Regulation and Compliance conference on 28 April. Click here for details.

Tags:




Leave a Comment

By clicking Submit you consent to Legal Futures storing your personal data and confirm you have read our Privacy Policy and section 5 of our Terms & Conditions which deals with user-generated content. All comments will be moderated before posting.

Required fields are marked *
Email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Reports

No larger firm can ignore the demands of innovation – that was the clear message from our most recent roundtable: “The law firm of the future”, sponsored by LexisNexis Enterprise Solutions. It comes in many forms, predominantly but not just technology, and is not simply a case of automating process. Expertise and process are not mutually exclusive.

Blog

20 November 2018

Failing to find documents can have a serious impact on your bottom line

Indexing and searching in content management systems have serious weaknesses that haven’t always received the attention they need from law firms – up to 30% of documents are invisible to search.

Read More