Five firms have been appointed by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) to its first ever litigation panel.

The SRA said the purpose of the tender was to establish a panel of firms able to provide co-ordinated support across a range of different types of service including contested interventions, judicial reviews, regulatory appeals, recovery litigation and regulatory advice.

The five firms are Legal Futures Associate Bevan Brittan, Capsticks, Devonshires, Field Fisher Waterhouse and Russell-Cooke.
The appointments will be for three years and will replace the previous arrangements where a small number of firms had been instructed on a case-by-case basis.

SRA chief executive Antony Townsend said: “We are pleased that the objectives of the tender were met. The firms selected had to show their expertise and act as a co-ordinated team when dealing with large and complex cases as well as satisfying us on their commitment to equality and diversity principles.

“We achieved our aim and received a good response from all parts of the legal community.  We are confident that the five firms we have chosen will provide us with high-quality service over the next three years.”

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