First legal executives granted historic independent practice rights


Dr Ruth Hendry, Scott Hendry and Dr Frantz Iwu

Dr Ruth Hendry, Scott Hendry and Dr Frantz Iwu

A member of the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives who specialises in conveyancing has become the first to receive independent practice rights.

Scott Morris, who is in the process of becoming a partner at Gloucester firm Langley Wellington and of becoming a chartered legal executive, has become a CILEx conveyancing practitioner.

He was presented with his certificate last week at a ceremony which also marked the achievements of Dr Ruth Hendry and Dr Frantz Iwu, who were the first to be granted independent rights to conduct probate and immigration work respectively.

Dr Hendry has also gained conveyancing rights, meaning she is the first CILEx member to obtain dual practice rights. She works at mid-Wales firm Hugh Anton-Stephens Notary Public. Dr Iwu runs his own immigration practice, the Immigration Advisory Unit.

While some chartered legal executives already run their own legal businesses, until now they have not been able to handle reserved work unless working for other lawyers.

Alan Kershaw, chair of CILEx Regulation said: “These developments create the new environment where anyone wishing to start out on a legal career can now do that, from professional cradle to grave, through the CILEx route.

“They can do so knowing that the end point could be not fellowship in itself, not the opportunity to progress to another title altogether, but the right to practise the law, in any area where they can show competence, not as someone’s employee but in their own name, and, if they wish, in the name of their own business.”

Mr Morris said: “I feel very privileged to be the first CILEx member to receive these new practice rights. I’m grateful for the opportunities the CILEx route has offered me, and as I work towards partnership in my firm and fellowship of the institute, I want to thank everyone who has supported me along the way.”

Dr Hendry added: “Qualifying as a chartered legal executive, and achieving these new practice rights, was a hard slog – but it’s all worth it when you get the approval from CILEx Regulation. I’d encourage anyone thinking of applying to go for it.”

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