Exclusive: solicitors repay £1m to clients to end SRA investigations

Print This Post

By Legal Futures

10 June 2010


Miners: solicitors repaying inappropriate deductions

Solicitors have agreed to pay back to clients over £1 million to end investi-gations being conducted by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), Legal Futures can reveal.

Figures obtained by this website show that the SRA has entered into 54 separate regulatory settlement agreements (RSAs) with 133 individuals since it was allowed to do so in 2008, although we understand that record-keeping in the early days of RSAs was not totally reliable. Of those, 51 have been or shortly will be published on the SRA’s website.

Sixteen of the RSAs to date have involved agreed offers to repay clients affected by, for example, inappropriate deductions of fees in miners’ compensation matters or overcharged  disbursements. The SRA estimates that pursuant to these agreements repayments of approximately  £1,003,600 have been made.

RSAs have also been used to deal by consent with appeals to the High Court in relation to practising certificate conditions and to remove solicitors immediately from the roll by consent, where, for example, they have retired or are suffering from ill health.

RSAs are not equivalent to commercial settlements; they are on the SRA’s terms, which are agreed to by the solicitor concerned.



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

New right to paid leave for bereaved parents: A welcome move

Kimberley Manning DAS

This year, like many in recent years, has seen some key changes within the employment law field, with the government, trade unions and lobbyists remaining endlessly engaged in seeking to impose their interpretation of fair balance between employers and their respective workforces. Although consensus on that equilibrium can never really be achieved, sometimes there are pieces of legislative movement which are difficult to argue with regardless of your perspective: This is one of those. Published on 13 October 2017, the Parental Bereavement (Pay and Leave) Bill would provide for the first time a legal right to parents who are employed and have suffered the death of a child, a minimum of two weeks’ leave in which to grieve.

November 20th, 2017