Exclusive: LSB to have new chair after Pitt decides against applying for reappointment


Pitt: 70 days’ work for the LSB a year

The Legal Services Board (LSB) is to have a new chair in the coming months, after incumbent Sir Michael Pitt took himself out of the running for a second three-year term, Legal Futures can reveal.

When Sir Michael’s predecessor, David Edmonds, was appointed for a second term, it was done without the position being advertised, but the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) has this time decided to hold an open competition.

Sir Michael’s term comes to an end on 30 April 2017, and the LSB has confirmed to us that he has decided not to apply for reappointment.

The process will be conducted under the new Cabinet Office governance code on public appointments and the main board of the LSB was told recently that an appointment will not be made until late June/early July.

As a result, the MoJ appears to have breached the code. This says that departments should build sufficient time into their planning for ministers to decide against making a reappointment or extension and holding a process to appoint a successor.

It adds: “There is no automatic presumption of reappointment; each case should be considered on its own merits, taking in to account a number of factors including, but not restricted to, the diversity of the current board and its balance of skills and experience.”

No reappointment or extension can be made without a satisfactory performance appraisal.

The MoJ did not say why it has decided on an open competition rather than reappointment. A spokesman said: “The process of appointing a new chair to the Legal Services Board is underway. The post will be advertised this month and the government encourages applications from those keen to ensure greater diversity in the legal profession.”

Sir Michael receives a non-pensionable remuneration of £63,000 per annum for a commitment of at least 70 days a year.

He has cut a far less controversial figure in his tenure than Mr Edmonds, but effectively came to the same conclusion as his predecessor that radical reform of legal regulation was needed, with publication last year of the LSB’s “vision for legislative reform of the regulatory framework”.




Leave a Comment

By clicking Submit you consent to Legal Futures storing your personal data and confirm you have read our Privacy Policy and section 5 of our Terms & Conditions which deals with user-generated content. All comments will be moderated before posting.

Required fields are marked *
Email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog


A new route to practice rights for chartered legal executives

Following approval from the Legal Services Board in May 2022, CILEx Regulation has launched an alternative route for chartered legal executives to obtain independent practice rights.


NFTs, the courts and the role of injunctions

In May, news broke that a non-fungible token was the subject of a successful injunction made by the Singapore High Court. The NFT in question is part of the very valuable Bored Ape Yacht Club series.


Matthew Pascall

Low-value commercial cases – an achievable challenge for ATE insurers

There are many good claims brought for damages that are likely to be significantly less than twice the cost of bringing the claim. These cases present a real challenge for insurers.


Loading animation