Conveyancing fee-earner and two trainee solicitors banned from profession


SRA: Section 43 orders imposed

An unqualified fee-earner who stole £569,000 from one of the country’s biggest conveyancing firms, and worked at other firms under different names before being sent to prison, has been banned from working in the profession.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) has published a regulatory settlement agreement making Caprice Lindo, a former employee of O’Neil Patient, subject to a so-called section 43 order.

It said that between October and December 2013, Ms Lindo was employed by O’Neil Patient. In late 2013, she arranged for up to £569,000 of client money to be sent from the firm’s accounts to fraudsters with whom she was associated.

When a client complained, O’Neill Patient investigated and dismissed Ms Lindo.

Over the next two years, she sought employment with other firms under the alias of ‘Chloe Wilson’, before being convicted of four counts of fraud by abuse of position in April 2017.

Ms Lindo was sentenced to three and a half years imprisonment.

Meanwhile, the SRA has also issued a section 43 order to Wasim Iqbal, a trainee solicitor who was jailed for his role in the first insurance fraud convictions to involve solicitors. Two solicitors were also imprisoned, along with three other men.

Mr Iqbal was jailed for 15 months for conspiracy to defraud by fraudulent representation. At the time he worked at Eastways Solicitors.

A third section 43 order has been given to Matthew Francis, who was employed as a business development adviser and trainee solicitor at Stroud firm Winterbotham Smith & Penley from 1 March 2016 until 31 January 2017, when his contract was terminated.

He was found to have installed three personal cloud drives on to the firm’s network and stored precedents and templates onto the drives. On two occasions he denied storing any firm data on the drives. His conduct was found to be dishonest.

His current employment details are unknown.

Section 43 orders are the most that the SRA can do to stop non-solicitors operating in the profession. Under them, recipients can seek the SRA’s permission to work in the profession again.




Leave a Comment

By clicking Submit you consent to Legal Futures storing your personal data and confirm you have read our Privacy Policy and section 5 of our Terms & Conditions which deals with user-generated content. All comments will be moderated before posting.

Required fields are marked *
Email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Reports

Our latest special report, produced in association with Temple Legal Protection, looks at the role of after-the-event (ATE) insurance in commercial litigation post-LASPO. We are at a time when insurers, solicitors, clients and litigation funders work ever more closely to create funding packages that work for all of them, with conditional fee and even damages-based agreements now part of many law firms’ armoury.

Blog

10 October 2019

How much is your SEO budget?

If the answer is ‘what SEO budget?’, then we have a major problem. Building a website is like putting up a fancy electronic billboard in the middle of the desert. SEO is the action of driving people to look at it.

Read More

Loading animation