Thomson Reuters adds Blackstone’s Criminal Practice to its Westlaw UK service

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18 May 2017


Thomson ReutersAgreement creates a unique and comprehensive view of criminal law and practice

Thomson Reuters is to add Blackstone’s Criminal Practice to its leading online legal research platform, Westlaw UK. The agreement between the company and Oxford University Press (OUP), publisher of Blackstone’s, is expected to create a unique and comprehensive view of criminal law and practice in a single online solution.

This announcement comes at a time when publishers are increasingly moving towards the integration of multiple content formats and their professional customers, including criminal lawyers, demand access to a variety of perspectives and guidance for their chosen field. The combination of Blackstone’s Criminal Practice alongside the primary law and extensive Criminal Law portfolio on Westlaw UK, aims to address this demand and create an invaluable online resource of expertise and information for Criminal law practitioners.

Desmond Brady, Director of Public Sector, Bar and Academic at Thomson Reuters Legal UK & Ireland, commented: “Westlaw UK currently provides a rich ecosystem of Criminal Law resources and today’s agreement will further cement its position as a go-to-resource for criminal lawyers. This is a significant step in ensuring our customers can access the whole range of primary resources and expert legal commentary they need to advise their clients with confidence and success.”

Thomson Reuters will include the digitised edition of Blackstone’s Criminal Practice alongside its existing online Criminal Law portfolio on Westlaw UK. The portfolio includes: Archbold Criminal Pleading, Evidence & Practice; Criminal Appeal Reports; Criminal Law Week; Wilkinson’s Road Traffic Offences;  Current Sentencing Practice; Thomas’s Sentencing Referencer; Crown Court Index; Archbold Magistrates; and Criminal Law Review, among many more.

Blackstone’s Criminal Practice is a book about English criminal law. The First Edition was published by Blackstone Press in 1991. The Twenty-seventh Edition was published by Oxford University Press in 2016.

Westlaw UK is the online legal research service subscribed to by thousands of legal practitioners across the globe. It provides swift, easy access to a complete library of primary and secondary law with close to 400,000 full-text case reports and transcripts and a time-saving case analysis for all decisions in the UK from 1865 and the EU from 1954. Legislation coverage spans the UK and all devolved Parliaments and includes Westminster bills for future laws. Plus Westlaw UK holds over 100 full-text journals, thousands of articles and half a million more article abstracts together with trusted, authoritative commentary titles from Sweet & Maxwell.

Thomson Reuters

Thomson Reuters is the world’s leading source of news and information for professional markets. Our customers rely on us to deliver the intelligence, technology and expertise they need to find trusted answers. The business has operated in more than 100 countries for more than 100 years. For more information, visit www.thomsonreuters.com.



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