Slater & Gordon launches clinical negligence team in Yorkshire

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11 February 2014


Rachel Brown appointed to offer specialist clinical negligence legal advice

Law firm Slater & Gordon will now offer clinical negligence legal advice in Yorkshire after appointing specialist lawyer Rachel Brown to its Sheffield office.

Rachel is the first clinical negligence lawyer to work from Slater & Gordon’s Sheffield office. She joins from Irwin Mitchell Sheffield where she spent more than four years. Rachel  specialises in all types of clinical negligence cases, including birth injury, inquests, CJD cases, neurological and orthopaedic injury cases.

Rachel said: “Clinical negligence has a devastating impact on the lives of victims and their families.

“It is an honour to help people in Sheffield and Yorkshire through what is very often one of the most difficult times of their lives and ultimately help them get the justice they deserve.”

Simon Allen, head of Slater & Gordon’s Sheffield office said:  “We are thrilled to have a solicitor the calibre of Rachel joining our Sheffield team.

“Clinical negligence is an area that can be incredibly upsetting for our clients. We look forward to providing a world class legal service to clients seeking help in this area and to further growing our team in the future.”



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