Riliance releases new modules

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2 May 2013


Riliance has announced the release of four new modules for its market leading risk and compliance software product

Firms can now gain the benefit of a module dedicated to one of the Code of Conducts hot topics. The Undertakings module enable users to record and monitor all undertakings in one central register and be prompted to discharge the undertaking at the appropriate time.

The client-orientated nature of OFR requires firms to ensure they are offering the best possible service to their customers and with Riliance’s new Client Feedback module, subscribers can collate and report on the responses to their client questionnaires.

In addition to the areas above, Riliance has focused on ensuring users have the tools they need to meet their requirements under the Bribery Act. Using the new Bribery Risk Assessment firms can record reviews, and possible risks to the firms Bribery Policy, in addition the Bribery Gift Register provides the subscribers with a prompt to perform due diligence on all potential gifts/hospitality.

Brian Rogers, Director of Regulation and Compliance Services at Riliance, said

“We are continuing to improve and enhance the services we provide to our rapidly growing user base and further exciting developments will be taking place over the coming months. Our aim is to deliver a first class product which greatly improves the way in which firms manage and monitor risk and helps them to gain and maintain compliance across their business”

For more information about the changes that have already been made to the system, or the future development plans, please contact newmodules@riliance.co.uk.



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