Quality service and efficiency combined – supported by Liberate from Linetime

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27 October 2014


Dickinson Wood contract

South Yorkshire law firm Dickinson Wood contract with specialist legal software supplier Linetime to provide the practice with the very latest in case management and online case tracking.

In addition the firm will be undertaking a technology refresh, implementing the latest Microsoft technologies.

Dickinson Wood’s management team recognise the importance technology plays in ensuring clients receive quality legal services and in enabling these services to be provided at competitive rates. Linetime’s Liberate case management system was selected to provide the firm with an efficient and consistent legal services platform.

“We recognised the need to have an effective case management system to provide our clients with a quality service each and every time. In addition to improving service levels the central storage of all case related information, including documents and emails, will allow our compliance officers greater visibility and control. This is key to monitoring all aspects of our service delivery” commented Linda Baughan, Practice Manager.

The firm provide a range of legal services to individuals and business users.

 



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