National law firm unveils new identity

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13 February 2013


Russell Jones & Walker has announced the completion of its transition to the Slater & Gordon brand name following last year’s headline grabbing merger with Slater & Gordon in Australia – the country’s largest consumer firm and the first in the world to be publicly listed.

The firm has undergone a complete brand review and today unveiled its new website, www.slatergordon.co.uk, marking the now international firm’s commitment to becoming a market leader in the UK as Slater & Gordon LLP.

The move comes at a critical time of change in the UK legal industry after the Legal Services Act opened the market to outside investment and ahead of impending changes to the personal injury sector

Slater & Gordon’s UK Chief Executive Officer, Neil Kinsella, said the rebrand marks an exciting time for the firm and its future, as it moves into a new landscape.

He said: “We are embracing this enormous opportunity which underpins our growth plan and helps us work to our aim of becoming the largest and most trusted provider of personal legal services in the UK.

“One thing that will not change, though, is our commitment to making access to justice available and affordable to all.  This is what puts us ahead of our competition, attracts people to work with us and makes our firm unique.

“We will continue to deliver first class legal services but from here on in, we will be known as Slater & Gordon. The name change will further enhance the Slater & Gordon brand as will the new website.”

The rebrand from Russell Jones & Walker to Slater & Gordon is in effect from 11 February 2013.

 



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