Legal aid supervision – All you need to know

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12 August 2014


The Legal Aid Agency has made a legal aid supervision course mandatory for new supervisors and for those who have not supervised recently. This brand new course will satisfy the supervision requirements in the Legal Aid Agency Standard Crime, Civil & Family Contracts.

Get it wrong and you risk your contract being terminated, a breach of SRA regulations and being reported by your COLP – with increasingly lower legal rates and fixed fees and you cannot afford to get this wrong.

This full-day comprehensive course will cover the new supervisor requirements introduced by the LAA, along with tips on how to reduce the risk of your firm losing its legal aid. If you are a new or existing SQM or Lexcel supervisor, family, crime or social welfare supervisor, then this is an essential course for you.

Click here to read the full course outline

For more information on seminar dates and pricing, or to book your place, please email lucy@mblseminars.com quoting reference ‘LF14’.



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