Jures undertakes next piece of ABS research: your input welcome

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26 April 2012


Legal market research company Jures is undertaking the next in a series of reports on the Legal Services Act. The report will explore law firms’ attitudes to alternative business structures (ABSs) and Legal Futures readers are welcome to contribute to the survey for the report.

The aim of the research is to find out what drivers, if any, are attracting law firms to convert to an ABS. It will look at the potential different models and seek to identify the pros and cons for law firms and new market entrants of adopting an ABS structure.

The final report will be distributed across the UK’s leading 200+ firms and as such, forms a useful piece of benchmarking. There will also be a panel debate to discuss the findings of the survey. Further details will be published here soon.

The link to the survey questions is here. Responses will be anonymous, so complete confidentiality is assured. Ideally, every question should be answered. The cut-off date for replies is 8 May.

Previous Jures reports can be downloaded for free here.

 



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