Ground-breaking ABS to implement Eclipse Proclaim

Print This Post

10 November 2014


Aspire Law – a partnership between Aspire, a national spinal injury charity, and Moore Blatch, a personal injury law firm – is implementing solution.

Aspire recently became the first organisation of its type to own a stake in an alternative business structure (ABS) law firm.  The new venture will be dedicated to providing a specialist service to people with spinal cord injuries, creating a Social Enterprise Model which places clients’ needs and requirements at the centre of work, delivering a highly personalised service. The service could in time expand to include advisory elements around housing, education, care and rehabilitation.

Aspire Law will make no deduction of fees from the compensation awarded to clients and – as a joint partner – the charity will receive 50% of profits to reinvest into projects, like the Aspire Housing Programme which provides accessible accommodation to spinal cord injured people discharged from hospital who would otherwise have nowhere suitable to live.

The new ABS is implementing Proclaim across the business, providing a desktop solution for fee earners dealing with a broad range of claims.  Proclaim provides scope for the firm to expand its offerings into other areas, providing the ability to service the complete needs of its client base.

Chris Byron, managing director of Aspire Law, comments:

“We are extremely proud to be able to introduce an alternative way of delivering legal services to people with spinal cord injuries, which combines the legal expertise of our team with strong charitable values.  The decision to implement Proclaim was commercially right for us as a business; having seen how the system enhanced processes at another Moore Blatch business, Moore Blatch Resolve, we were confident that Proclaim would be able to deliver in line with the aims of Aspire Law.”

 



Associate News is provided by Legal Futures Associates.
Find out about becoming an Associate



Legal Futures Blog

Three reasons why you should be more vigilant about the emails you send in 2018

Ben Mitchell DocsCorp

In December 2017, the Information Commissioner’s Office (reported that data security incidents between April and June 2017 had increased by 15% compared to the previous year. This is nothing new – data breaches have been on the rise for years. Yet law firms are often more concerned about protecting sensitive information from external threats than from a far more likely cause: human error. Human error was behind the forwarding of confidential plans from The Bank of England to The Guardian. The sender included the wrong recipient in the email and, ever since, autocomplete has been disabled and staff at the UK’s main financial regulator must now enter every single address manually.

January 17th, 2018