Free webinar: security basics for law firms

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1 September 2016


Clio 200 Clio, the world’s leading cloud-based legal practice management system, present a free hour long webinar showing you how to implement a security plan for your firm.

Lawyers are required to enact ‘reasonable’ safeguards when storing client files. They must also deal with an ever-increasing number of new privacy regulations imposed on them and their clients. When handling sensitive client data, lawyers need to balance issues of confidentiality and privacy against building productive workflows. Failure to keep client information secure can lead to a potential waiver of privilege, malpractice claims, and even fines from various government agencies. Law firms need rigorous security, no matter their firm’s size or practice area.

A law firm’s security plan must include three components: user training and access controls, secure technology, and a recovery plan. Join Clio’s lawyer in residence, Joshua Lenon, as he shows you how to enact a security plan for your law firm with guest Chris Wiesinger of CloudMask, an encryption service provider for cloud-based technologies. In this free one hour webinar you will learn.

  • The difference between confidentiality and privacy for law firms
  • The regulations that apply to all law firms, as well as those for specific practice areas
  • The security planning tips you can use to assess and protect your law firm
  • The tools to improve your law firm’s security profile

RSVP now for Security Basics for Law Firms, taking place on Tuesday, September 6 at 6pm GMT.



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