Free kit for sole practitioners interested in being a virtual practice

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10 May 2012


Virtual Practices – the online software and accounting division of (SOS) – will offer a free information kit to delegates at the Solicitor Sole Practitioners’ Group Conference.

Appropriately stored on a data stick/laser pen, the kit includes success stories from Virtual Practices clients, FAQs, costs and an independent IT guide.

Virtual Practices provides hosted legal accounting and case management software plus a full legal bookkeeping service, which reduces overheads and the administrative burden for smaller firms so they can focus more on delivering the law and improving client care. Members of the Virtual Practices team will be on hand to introduce delegates to this innovative solution developed specifically for sole practitioners, start-ups and boutique firms.

Natalie Jennings, who heads up Virtual Practices, said: “As one of the very first companies to offer legal software and cashiering as services, we enable our clients to get on with the job of delivering legal advice and excellent client care without worrying about capital investment in IT or meeting mandatory accounting and reporting requirements.

“We look forward to meeting sole practitioners at the SPG Conference who want to know more about the benefits of being a virtual practice and outsourcing their cashiering work.”  

Smaller firms unable to attend the SPG Conference on 12 and 13 May 2012 can also receive the Virtual Practices information kit by emailing info@virtualpractices.co.uk.



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