ETSOS star in commercial

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15 January 2014


Conveyancing search specialist ETSOS has announced the launch of its for the commercial property sector.

The platform, designed and developed from scratch specifically for commercial conveyancers, follows months of user consultation and comes with no hub or administration fees. It is the first of its kind to offer full screen mapping, a significant advance on other market offerings where small scale mapping functionality hampers ease of use, speed and accuracy. Users can also elect to receive back 1:2500 scaled maps that are fully Land Registry-compliant.

Another major enhancement is the bespoke portfolio facility. Aimed at customers with high volume developments, ETSOS can upload plots to the system on their behalf; this is a free service, with only the required searches being charged for and should dramatically reduce the administrative burden associated with large-scale, complex conveyances.

As well as a complete range of conveyancing searches firms can access company searches, commercial EPCs and bespoke title insurance from a single platform.

For ETSOS managing director, Phil Natusch, this is all about raising the bar in the commercial conveyancing arena: “We’ve invested a huge amount of time, energy and resource into building the platform that the industry has been asking for. The underlying premise was to make the whole commercial search process as easy, quick and compliant as possible while also introducing desirable functionality such as improved mapping and bulk uploading. ETSOS is now the stand-out one-stop-shop for commercial property lawyers, as we are with residential conveyancers, with both platforms sharing the ‘free to use’ principle that has become the hallmark of ETSOS solutions.”

 



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