DAS employee wins WellChild award

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19 September 2013


Prince Harry with DAS employee and WellChild award winner, Chris Morter

Underwriter Chris Morter from leading legal expenses insurer, DAS, was last week awarded the Helping Hands Volunteer Award at the WellChild Awards 2013, where he also got the chance to rub shoulders with Royalty.

The celebrity-studded awards were held on 11th September, hosted by Vernon Kay and Tess Daly at the Dorchester Hotel in London, where award winners were invited to a private reception with the charity’s patron, Prince Harry.

Chris was nominated for the award by Lee Trunks, who is the project manager for WellChild’s Helping Hands project, which organises home and garden makeovers for sick children.

Chris was team leader for the project in Bristol creating a new garden for Clive, a teenager with severe epilepsy. Chris had to organise a team of 15 from six different Bristol and Bath companies, coming together over two days. The project was extremely successful. He was also instrumental in securing funding towards the project and negotiated a significant reduction in the cost of materials. Chris has supported WellChild with other fundraising initiatives and has already led another successful Helping Hands project, with more planned for the future.

The WellChild Awards celebrate the inspiring qualities of some of the country’s seriously ill young people and the dedication of the people who go that extra mile to really make a difference to their lives.   They were attended by celebrities including, Rod Stewart and Penny Lancaster-Stewart, Pixie Lott, Karen Brady, Duncan Bannatyne, Tim Vine, Konnie Huq and Chris Hollins.

Entries for the 2013 Awards were judged by an expert panel including children’s health researchers, former winners and health professionals.

 



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