Chance for community groups to secure £1,000 of support

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17 March 2014


Jo Hudgell (right), Neil Hudgell Solicitors, presents £750 to Jeannie Webster (left) and Brenda Elm, (Centre) garden project worker, to help run the Rainbow Gardens on Levisham Close, Hull

OUR charitable Trust is once again urging groups from across Yorkshire to apply for funding of up to £1,000 to help deliver projects aimed at improving lives within their communities.

Established in the summer of 2012, the Neil Hudgell Solicitors Trust has already supported more than 290 community groups across the county, with more than £80,000 being donated.

The deadline for the next round of applications is fast approaching on March 31, and Jo Hudgell, who heads the committee awarding the funds, says all worthy projects, no matter how small, will be considered.

“We will be sitting down to discuss the applications we have received for this quarter in the next couple of weeks, but there is still time for people to put their projects forward as our application process is simple to complete,” she said.

“The grants are modest in size, but in most cases the seeds of the great community project or initiative have already been sown and our money simply helps them reach out a little further.

“There are so many community groups doing great things because of the huge commitment and dedication of those leading them, and such groups and people are the kind we want to support.”

To qualify for a grant of up to £1,000 from the Trust, groups must be based in Yorkshire, have a turnover of less than £25,000, and be able to demonstrate the positive impact funding will have in their community.

Neil Hudgell Solicitors Trust focuses on awarding grants to community groups supporting the elderly and vulnerable, encouraging educational achievement, developing grass roots sport, and promoting social inclusion.



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