Young firm invests in Proclaim Case Management to streamline PPI claim process

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1 December 2011


Ambitious young practice Slater Hayward Law is implementing Eclipse’s Proclaim Case Management software in a firm-wide rollout.

Slater Hayward specialises in financial claims, namely mis-sold payment protection insurance (PPI) and unreasonable credit card/loan charges. Following the British Bankers Association’s decision not to pursue further legal action over PPI, all outstanding mis-selling cases are currently being settled. The resultant influx of new cases for Slater Hayward resulted in the need to find a software solution that could provide a robust and efficient claims-handling environment.

Following a full review of the legal software market, Slater Hayward selected Eclipse’s Proclaim PPI system for rollout. Slater Hayward is working with Eclipse to configure the standard PPI solution in line with the practice’s bespoke requirements and future plans to provide a broader range of financial claim services.

In addition, the firm is taking Eclipse’s FileView online case-tracking solution. FileView will enable Slater Hayward clients to monitor live claim progress via a secure online portal, greatly reducing the number of administrative phone calls the firm receives.

Lyn Slater, principal at Slater Hayward, said: “The financial claims sector has really taken off, with huge numbers of people finally given the green light to settle on mis-sold policies and unfair ‘fines’.

“To manage such large volumes of claims, our chosen case management solution is an integral part of our business model. Proclaim really sits apart as the system of choice – infinitely flexible, easy to use, and fast to implement – three very big ticks in three very important boxes.”



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