The Big Bang: navigating the new legal order

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10 June 2011


Legal Futures Associate Byfield Consultancy, in association with public affairs specialists HJCL, is hosting an early evening workshop event entitled ‘The Big Bang: Navigating the new legal order’.

The event will examine how law firms can best face the communications and regulatory challenges accompanying the implementation of the Legal Services Act 2007.

From October 2011 we shall see new entrants into the legal market, important changes in how legal services are procured and greater competition as a result. Law firms will need to decide how to adapt to the changing landscape in order to meet the challenges and opportunities that will soon become apparent.

The Byfield/HJCL event will feature:

  • A presentation on legal services regulatory landscape, forthcoming changes and how it will impact on the traditional legal services;
  • SWOT analysis of the reforms;
  • A brainstorm on utilising the new deregulated landscape;
  • An overview of communication techniques that will be used by new entrants to the market; and
  • Top tips on responding to government consultations.

Following the presentations there will be a Q&A session, followed by networking and refreshments.

The workshop is on Thursday 30 June at 6pm at The Law Society, Chancery Lane, 113 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1PL.

To attend, please e-mail Victoria Pafiti at Victoria@Byfieldconsultancy.com


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