HDCS selects Eclipse’s Proclaim system in £250,000 investment

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5 September 2011


HDCS (Hill Dickinson Claim Solutions) has chosen the Proclaim Case Management Software system from Legal Futures Associate Eclipse Legal Systems to replace the firm’s legacy claims management systems.

The specialist unit at Hill Dickinson LLP (a top 35 law firm) provides a complete claims management service on behalf of insurance clients, acting for some of the country’s leading organisations, including household names such as Tesco Insurance.

Rapid growth in the HDCS unit necessitated a review of its existing core claims software systems. Following a review of solutions available, the firm made the decision to implement Eclipse’s Proclaim solution for an initial roll-out of 150 users.

As a key part of the project, Eclipse will be providing bespoke Proclaim configuration using the system’s in-built toolkits. The final solution delivered to HDCS will be unique to the practice, providing individual claim workflows from inception through to litigation, across the unit’s different teams (uninsured loss recovery, motor, casualty, etc).

In addition, the firm has chosen Eclipse’s FileView online case-tracking tool to provide its clients with 24/7 access to live case progression data. Eclipse is also carrying out a migration of data from the existing HDCS software system to Proclaim.

Keith Feeny, director of IT & operations across the Hill Dickinson business, said: “We continue to experience substantial growth and the HDCS unit in particular is going from strength to strength. Operational excellence is absolutely vital if we are to push forward and win more business – Eclipse’s Proclaim system provides an excellent foundation for our business process requirements.”



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