Epoq shortlisted for FT Innovative Lawyers Awards

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16 September 2011


Both Epoq, the company behind DirectLaw, and its executive chairman Richard Cohen, have been shortlisted in the 2011 Financial Times Innovative Lawyers Awards.

They have been shortlisted in the Legal Industry Pioneer and Legal Innovator of the Year categories respectively.

These prestigious awards are part of a report researched and produced by the Financial Times, which is now in its sixth year of publication. The theme of the 2011 report and awards is ‘Taking bold decisions’ and will recognise the bold ideas of the past year and the leaders in responding to market changes.

The report has become one of the top legal rankings in Europe and the accompanying awards are widely regarded as the best researched in the market. It presents a unique analysis of the legal industry and is the only ranking of lawyers by innovation.

Apparently, 500 submissions from a record 95 law firms from across Europe were received by the FT this year, so to have been shortlisted is a huge achievement in itself. 

The winners will be announced during an awards ceremony at the Science Museum in London on 5 October 2011. Visit www.ftconferences.com/innovativelawyers to find out more.



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