Eclipse is leading the way in A2A

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1 April 2011


Leading case management software provider Eclipse Legal Systems has announced successful rollout of its A2A “release 1” update.

Following the Ministry of Justice’s well-publicised new process, all road traffic accident (RTA) claims of a value less than £10,000 must be processed through a central portal. Eclipse, a Legal Futures Associate, was the first vendor to make integration with the portal available, via a seamless A2A (application-to-application) method.

Using A2A, claimant law firms with Eclipse’s Proclaim Case Management solution can manage RTA claims entirely through the Proclaim desktop, without resorting to the MoJ’s slower, manual web browser method.

The RTA portal developer, RTA Portal Co, has implemented a series of changes to streamline use of the system for claimant solicitors. This update is known as release 1 and went live on 29 March. It is mandatory for all portal users to comply with the new system with immediate effect.

Eclipse has rolled out the release 1 changes to over 100 of its RTA law firm clients, resulting in full compliance – by the deadline – for all Proclaim A2A users. Clients include national heavyweights through to small and high-street firms.

Eclipse’s founder and chief software architect Steve Ough said: “It is vital for all of our Proclaim A2A clients that we continue to provide a fast and proactive development service to enable them to use the RTA claims portal without disturbance. The recent upgrade has been rolled out to over 100 Proclaim A2A sites without a hitch.

“This level of technical support and development will continue to be of huge importance for our clients, as the government suggests increased use of the portal in future for other claim types including employers’ liability, public liability and clinical negligence.”

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