Another record year for Eclipse Legal Systems as turnover hits £8m

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14 July 2011


The UK’s leading case management software provider, Eclipse Legal Systems, has reported record results for its 2010/11 trading year.

The Legal Futures Associate’s previous best results came in 2009/10, when the audited turnover figure stood at £6.6m. The financial year 2010/11, which ended on 30 June, saw Eclipse announce a revenue increase of 21% to a record high of £8m.

Highlights from the 2010/11 period include:

  • Record performance in terms of new client wins – 104 across all sectors, not including existing client upgrades and extensions;
  • More than 3,000 Proclaim end-user licence sales, bringing the total Proclaim user figure to over 14,000;
  • A management restructure to expand the Eclipse board to five members, maximising responsiveness to client needs and technological developments; and
  • The total staff number exceeding 100 (as of 11 July 2011, Eclipse employs 105 staff).

Eclipse’s founder and chief software architect, Steve Ough, said: “In the first 11 days of this new financial year (2011/12), we have already signed up six new client firms, one of them being a six-figure contract. In my opinion, this relays an extremely powerful message – that the fantastic results just announced for 2010/11 are a springboard for further growth and success.

“We are not resting on our laurels. We are expanding right across the board – in our development, support, and relationship management functions – and we will strive to continue giving law firms what they need. Robust, scalable, flexible, future-proof solutions that provide real value and real bottom-line benefits.”

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