Will-writer and paralegal bodies join forces

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31 August 2010


Will-writing: some paralegals will be able to set up on their own by passing two papers

The Fellowship of Professional Willwriters and Probate Practitioners has joined forces with the National Association of Licensed Paralegals (NALP) in the latest bid to take the lead in both the will-writing and paralegal markets.

The joint venture means that NALP members will be granted accredited status of the Fellowship and in turn Fellowship members will be grated affiliate status of NALP.

The Fellowship is a relatively new body that is actively lobbying for regulation of the industry – an issue currently under investigation by the Legal Services Board (see ) – while the NALP is recognised as an awarding organisation by Ofqual, the qualifications regulator.

Associate, Graduate and Fellow members of the NALP are eligible for automatic membership of the Fellowship. If they also have qualifying employment in wills and probate, they can practise on their own if they complete a two Fellowship courses.

Rita Leat, president and CEO of the Fellowship, said: “Both organisations will offer benefits and qualifications to members so they can progress in their careers. We also want to promote paralegals and will-writers in the significant contribution they make in the provision of high-quality legal services.”

Amanda Hamilton, CEO of the NALP, said: “In these challenging times our alliance will enhance employment opportunities for our members. The Fellowship’s efforts towards gaining regulatory status will be an invaluable asset to the legal profession and we are proud to be associated with them.”

Earlier this summer, licensed paralegals who are members of the NALP were approved by the Valuation Tribunal for England to have rights of audience.

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One Response to “Will-writer and paralegal bodies join forces”

  1. These guys really need to get a bit more modern sounding……… “Fellowship”? Something like Lord of the Rings.

    However, what does regulation mean to these people and what will their insurance requirements be and to what level would members be trained/tested? These are the issues not whether Will writing is regulated or not.

    See our blog at http://www.wards.uk.com/forwards/2010/08/when-it-comes-to-will-writing-britain-has-no-will/ which sets out the issues.

  2. Dandy on August 31st, 2010 at 2:26 pm

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