Two new signings denote strong beginning, middle and end for Pilgrim

Print This Post

15 December 2010


Heathrow-based energy and shipping law firm Curtis Davis Garrard (CDG) and Oxfordshire commercial firm BrookStreet des Roches LLP have both switched to Pilgrim Systems’ practice management software from Iris Legal Solutions.

Pilgrim, a Legal Futures Associate, said it expected the development would bring its total of new clients for the year to 18 and that other firms were in the pipeline.

CDG, which advises the shipbuilding and offshore oil and gas sectors, said it chose to replace its Iris AIM Evolution system with Pilgrim’s LawSoft because it is “a progressive system that will grow with them as the partners develop the firm”.

Daniel Callaghan, CDG’s head of IT, said: “LawSoft was by far and away the most advanced system we looked at and had a price tag to match. But we focused on return on investment and are confident that we will reap significant benefits from using the system in all areas of our business.”

BrookStreet des Roches LLP, an Abingdon-based 75-person practice, is adopting LawSoft as a replacement for its Iris Videss system. Joe Hughes, the firm’s practice manager, said: “We like the breadth of the LawSoft product and take comfort from the fact the system uses Microsoft technology in all its layers.”

Colin Kennedy, Pilgrim’s chief operating officer added: “Both firms represent the progressive type of legal services organisation that will make maximum mileage out of the software. Our pipeline for 2011 is looking even stronger than it did at the beginning of this year and already we are at the preferred supplier stage with a number of firms. We very much believe that we will sustain our current rate of growth next year.”



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

Be careful you do not leave anything behind: will we see the end of chambers?

Charles Feeny

Experience of practice by digital support suggests that working practices will become much more informal and spontaneous, not requiring support by specific entities or even contractual arrangements. This is likely to be particularly true of the Bar, which is or should be a profession focusing on individuals. The future of the Bar is more likely to resemble a library as seen in Scotland and Ireland – albeit an electronic library – rather than the traditional chambers structure.

January 18th, 2017