Pemberton Greenish goes live with Pilgrim’s LawSoft 10

Print This Post

12 November 2010


London-based specialist property law firm Pemberton Greenish has successfully upgraded to LawSoft 10 from Legal Futures Associate Pilgrim Systems last month in a project that was completed in just two days.

Michael Kinnear, the firm’s IT manager, said: “We are delighted to have upgraded to LawSoft 10. The Pilgrim team were, as always, efficient and proactive and the upgrade has been a smooth process. Our users particularly like the updated interface, which is well designed and very intuitive. We are already starting to enjoy the benefits of this new release of LawSoft, such as enhanced document management functions.”

Colin Kennedy, Pilgrim’s chief operating officer, added: “We are really proud of LawSoft 10 and the ease with which clients are able to adopt our new technologies. LawSoft’s solid roots in leading-edge Microsoft technology mean we can deploy new releases in an efficient, pain-free manner to all our customers. Our newer customers find this experience refreshing. LawSoft 10 offers new, innovative tools and improved functionality through a fresh, even more user-friendly web interface. We would encourage all our clients to upgrade as soon as possible to take advantage of all these benefits.”



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

Algorithms and the law

Jeremy Barnett

Our aim is to start a discussion in the legal profession on the legal impact of algorithms on firms, software developers, insurers, and lawyers. In a longer paper, we consider whether algorithms should have a legal personality, an issue which will likely provoke an intense debate between those who believe in regulation and those who believe that ‘code is law’. In law, companies have the rights and obligations of a person. Algorithms are rapidly emerging as artificial persons: a legal entity that is not a human being but for certain purposes is legally considered to be a natural person. Intelligent algorithms will increasingly require formal training, testing, verification, certification, regulation, insurance, and status in law.

August 22nd, 2017