Ambitious personal injury specialist chooses Eclipse’s Proclaim solution

Print This Post

15 December 2010


Manchester-based law firm United Solicitors has invested in the Proclaim case management system from Legal Futures Associate Eclipse for a practice-wide roll-out.

United Solicitors specialises in the full range of accident and injury claims work, including road traffic accidents (RTA), Motor Insurers’ Bureau claims, employer’s liability and public liability cases.

The practice will be using the Proclaim Personal Injury software for each of these claim types.

It will also implement Proclaim Accounts to form a fully integrated practice management solution. As part of the process, Eclipse will transfer the data from the firm’s existing accounts system.

In addition, United Solicitors will use Proclaims Automated Task Manager tool to provide motor insurance reporting and enable features such as workflow-led SMS text messaging. Proclaims A2A module will be used to facilitate the processing of RTA claims within the Ministry of Justice’s RTA portal.

Muhammad Shahid, partner at United Solicitors said: “We are continually looking to evolve as a practice and to expand the scope of what we do. To provide a solid foundation for our future plans, a powerful and flexible case management and workflow system has been at the top of our shopping list for a while. Proclaim provides the ease of use and flexibility that we need, and will grow organically with us as our business matures.

“For example, there is a very strong chance that all low-value injury claims will, in future, have to be processed via the MoJ’s portal.  Eclipse is the leader in this type of development, and we have the confidence that Proclaim will be up to speed with whatever legislative changes are thrown at us.”



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

Algorithms and the law

Jeremy Barnett

Our aim is to start a discussion in the legal profession on the legal impact of algorithms on firms, software developers, insurers, and lawyers. In a longer paper, we consider whether algorithms should have a legal personality, an issue which will likely provoke an intense debate between those who believe in regulation and those who believe that ‘code is law’. In law, companies have the rights and obligations of a person. Algorithms are rapidly emerging as artificial persons: a legal entity that is not a human being but for certain purposes is legally considered to be a natural person. Intelligent algorithms will increasingly require formal training, testing, verification, certification, regulation, insurance, and status in law.

August 22nd, 2017