LSB reappoints legal advisers panel

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By Legal Futures

28 April 2011


Equality: LSB makes point of publishing advisers' diversity data

City firm Hogan Lovells and 39 Essex Street chambers have retained their roles as general legal advisers to the Legal Services Board (LSB).

The pair, as well as five specialist providers, have been reappointed following an internal review on their existing terms and rates until 31 March 2012.

They were all appointed in January 2010 following a competitive tender that attracted 16 respnses in all.

The specialist advisers are public law barristers Philip Havers QC of 1 Crown Office Row and Louise Jones of Temple Garden Chambers; Helga Breen, an employment law partner at City firm Lawrence Graham; Stephanie Grundy, a former parliamentary counsel; and Trading Terms Ltd, a legal practice that primarily provides locums for in-house legal teams and in-house secondees on behalf of law firms.

The review concluded that “existing provision from all providers has been satisfactory” and that the volume and mix of work is not likely to alter substantially in the coming year.

It was also felt that the costs and resource expenditure involved in re-tendering are likely to be disproportionate “in relation to the possibility of advantages gained given our level of spend”. The LSB has, however, reserved the right to make an off-panel instruction on an ad hoc basis if needed.

LSB general counsel Bruce Macmillan said: “We have been pleased by the quality of support provided by our panel, which brings together some very authoritative figures and teams from across the legal landscape. They have given and will continue to give valuable support to the LSB.”

A feature of the appointment is that the LSB includes links on its website to diversity data published by the firms and chambers on the panel.

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