LSB and OLC chiefs on quango top-earners list

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By Legal Futures

2 July 2010

Edmonds: around £65,000 for at least 70 days a year

The heads of both the Legal Services Board (LSB) and Office for Legal Complaints (OLC) are in the list of those working at quangos who earn more than £150,000, which was released by the Cabinet Office today.

LSB chairman David Edmonds is in a band of £60,000 to £64,000 for a time commitment of at least 70 days a year, while chief executive Chris Kenny receives a salary of £160,000 to £164,999. Elizabeth France, who chairs the OLC, receives £75,000 to £79,999 for a time commitment of at least 80 days a year, and chief executive Adam Sampson’s salary is £150,000 to £154,999.

Suma Chakrabarti, the permanent secretary of the Ministry of Justice, receives slightly more than the chief executives of the LSB and OLC, which are attached to the ministry, at £180,000 to £184,999.

Zahida Manzoor, the Legal Services Ombudsman, was in the same band at Chris Kenny until her other role as Legal Services Complaints Commissioner ceased on 3 April, taking her below the £150,000 threshold.

Former Law Society chief executive Janet Paraskeva, who recently became a Dame, appears twice on the list: as First Civil Service Commissioner she receives £120,000 to £124,999 (equal to 0.6 full-time salary) and as chairwoman of the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission she receives £95,000 to £99,999 for a two-day week. These are on top of various other appointments.

Other legal figures of interest on the list are:

  • Various parliamentary counsel, the highest-paid of which is £175,000 to £179,999;
  • Richard Foster, chairman of the Criminal Cases Review Commission (£100,000 to £104,999 for a three-day week but no pension);
  • The Director of Public Prosecutions, Keir Starmer (£195,000 to £199,999) and Crown Prosecution Service chief executive Peter Lewis (£160,000 to £164,999);
  • Trevor Phillips, chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (£110,000 to £114,999 for a 3.5-day week);
  • Baroness Prashar, chairwoman, Judicial Appointments Commission (£95,000 to £99,999 for a three-day week);
  • Chief Land Registrar Marco Pierleoni (£170,000 to £174,999);
  • Steve Walker, chief executive of the NHS Litigation Authority (£185,000 to £189,999);
  • Richard Alderman, director-general of the Serious Fraud Office (£165,000 to £169,999); and
  • Paul Jenkins, Treasury Solicitor (£155,000 to £159,999).

Cabinet Office minister Frances Maude said the release of the figures was the latest example of how “transparency is fast becoming an integral part of everything we do”.

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