Withers bids to lure entrepreneurs with fixed-fee start-up kit and host of extras

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13 May 2014


Isaac: competitively priced package

Leading private client firm Withers has launched a programme including start-up legal advice and magazine subscriptions aimed at helping entrepreneurs grow and protect their businesses.

The service, called ‘momentum’, brings together advice with networking in the hope of being with entrepreneurs throughout their journey.

An initial £2,500 gives clients access to a range of pro forma agreements – including employment contracts, an employee handbook and freelancer agreements – tax advice, an initial meeting and six-month follow-up.

It also includes an entrepreneurs network, a subscription to Monocle magazine, membership of Business Connections – the London Evening Standard’s members’ organisation for SMEs – an estate plan, and various events, including quarterly ‘from spare room to boardroom’ meetings for entrepreneurs.

The first of these takes place next month, featuring Russell Hall, co-founder of taxi app Hailo.

Withers partner Daniel Isaac said: “The concept behind momentum is to bring together all of the services that entrepreneurs need in a competitively priced package, as well as providing a forum for building valuable contacts with other business people who are active in the start-up and entrepreneurial space.

“We see our start-up pack only as the initial element of what we can offer, and have experience of assisting entrepreneurs with businesses at every stage of growth and maturity.  As more detailed and specialised advice is required, we can tailor our approach accordingly and see clients all the way through to exit planning.”



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