Palamon hires BT boss to advance legal services ambitions

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By Legal Futures

2 September 2014


Grossman: stronger together

Private equity business Palamon Capital Partners has brought in technology lawyer David Grossman to spearhead its plans to build the UK’s largest legal services provider.

Mr Grossman, who was most recently CEO of BT Expedite – the telecoms giant’s retail technology solutions business – has been appointed to lead the newly created Simplify Group.

This is made up of QualitySolicitors and the trio of businesses Palamon acquired just over a month ago – conveyancing brands Move With Us and DC Law, and probate specialist Chorus Law.

The current management teams of each business will stay in place, reporting to Mr Grossman, who Palamon said “will seek opportunities to further develop the existing businesses and pursue opportunities for growth through strategic integration”.

He began his career as a commercial and technology lawyer with City firm Berwin Leighton Paisner before working for AOL in various senior business development roles. He joined BT in 2006.

Mr Grossman said: “A major opportunity exists to build value based on the delivery of first-class legal services which have customer experience and satisfaction at their core. I am looking forward to developing and integrating the group of companies, each of which is separately a leader in its area, and which together will become even stronger.”

Palamon partner Daan Knottenbelt said: “We are delighted that David Grossman is bringing his experience and leadership to develop the new group, driving forward our vision for an innovative and significant player in the legal marketplace.”



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