Newly acquired ABS hits the acquisition trail as promised

Print This Post

3 July 2014


Watson: Fosters is an excellent fit

Simpson Millar – the law firm acquired last month by AIM-listed Fairpoint Group – has begun making good on by snapping up Bristol-based family law firm Foster & Partners.

The alternative business structure, which already has a Bristol office, said it is seeking to establish itself as “the preeminent provider of family law services in Bristol and the South West”.

Founded in 1976, Fosters has nine lawyers and partner Paul Foster said “we have no doubt the nationwide reach, breadth of experience and resources that Simpson Millar brings will benefit all our clients”.

Emma Pearmaine, head of the family law department at Simpson Millar, said: “Family law is a key area of growth for Simpson Millar so combining our nationwide practice groups with Fosters makes for a formidable partnership that will help establish a strong footprint in the region and deliver even more comprehensive legal solutions to clients.”

Managing director Peter Watson added: “Fosters is an excellent fit for our business and we are delighted that they have agreed to join with us. We have developed a very positive reputation in the legal sector for the manner in which we have conducted our consolidation activities and in step with our stated strategy as part of Fairpoint Group PLC, we will be pursuing further strategic acquisitions in the near future.”



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

The importance of being expert

Steve Rowley 3

I recently sat on a panel debate in Manchester, with the debate entitled – ATE insurers and sub-£250k claims. Whilst the title of the debate was probably written ahead of the government’s consultation paper to introducing fixed recoverable costs in lower-value clinical negligence claims, where £25,000 rather than £250,000 is being recommended, it nevertheless raised an interesting point on how after-the-event insurers can make premiums proportionate to damages, especially for cases worth less than £25,000.

April 26th, 2017