Government funding boosts ABS’s major growth plan

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11 October 2013


Edwina Hart (l) and Helen Molyneaux

Alternative business structure (ABS) NewLaw Solicitors is to grow by 25% after receiving finance from the Welsh government to help it expand.

The firm – which also has three ABS joint ventures, the most high profile of which is with insurer Ageas – is to recruit 86 people in its Cardiff headquarters, on top of the 320 it already employs across four offices.

The Welsh government is providing £156,690 in business finance, and NewLaw is also in discussions with the Department for Education and Skills to explore support for staff training.

Welsh economy minister Edwina Hart, who visited the firm to mark the announcement, said: “This is a significant expansion that will create a range of well-paid professional jobs in one of our key sectors.

“[NewLaw’s] decision to expand in Cardiff sends out a strong message to the legal sector that Wales can offer a perfect location for companies looking to expand with access to skilled staff and support to turn their growth plans into a reality.”

NewLaw chief executive Helen Molyneux said: “We have experienced significant growth over the last 12 months and have exciting plans to develop the business for the future and knowing that the minister has recognised our work is fantastic.

“We have exceptional talent in Wales and as a Welsh-headquartered business, it is important that we give local people the best possible job opportunities.”

The company is a significant employer in Cardiff and the surrounding area and has extensive links with Welsh law schools. The new employees will range from law graduates to experienced litigators.



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