BSB turns to CILEx to train non-legal staff

Print This Post

15 December 2014


Davies: even more consistent service

The Bar Standards Board (BSB) has turned to the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives (CILEx) to provide training to members of staff without legal qualifications.

There will be between 10 and 20 learners beginning the programme in January 2015. They will study the CILEx Level 3 unit called ‘Introduction to Law and Practice’ with a view to sitting the exam in June 2015. The training will be delivered by a combination of distance learning and in-house teaching.

BSB director-general Dr Vanessa Davies said: “It is important that all members of staff at the BSB have a good understanding of the sector, and the role played by the Bar in the administration of justice in England and Wales. This initiative will help us to deliver an even more consistent service to the public and the profession.”

Jenny Pelling, business director of CILEx Law School, said: “At CILEx Law School we require all of our customer service team to undertake introductory training in law and legal practice, so I have seen at first hand the benefits of such an initiative.”

Meanwhile, ILEX Professional Standards – CILEx’s regulatory arm – is to be the next major legal body to undergo a change in leadership, after chief executive Ian Watson announced he would be retiring in spring 2015, after nearly 40 years with CILEx.

Alan Kershaw, chair of IPS, said “It was on the basis of Ian’s immense knowledge and experience that IPS was set up as the independent regulator for CILEx. The board and I have drawn repeatedly on his expertise in taking forward our agenda, and the achievements of our first six years speak for themselves.

“We are ready now to embark on an entirely new period in the organisation’s development and I am delighted that Ian will be with us when we celebrate the granting of the first new practice rights to individuals and the regulation of businesses.”

Tags: , , ,



Leave a comment

* Denotes required field

All comments will be moderated before posting. Please see our Terms and Conditions

Legal Futures Blog

Rating lawyers by their wins and losses – a good idea?

Robert Ambrogi

Lawyers will give you any number of reasons why their win-loss rates in court are not accurate reflections of their legal skills. Yet a growing number of companies are evaluating lawyers by this standard – compiling and analysing lawyers’ litigation track records to help consumers and businesses make more-informed hiring decisions. The shortcomings of evaluating lawyers by win rates are many. Not least of them is that so few cases ever make it to a win or loss. Of equal concern is that, in the nuances of law practice, it is not always obvious what constitutes a win or a loss.

February 22nd, 2017