Bank launches free online work matching service

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9 January 2013


Arundale: helping firms win new business

A free online business supplier community that allows law firms and other providers to pitch for service requirements posted by other UK businesses has been launched by NatWest and RBS.

BizCrowd, which is designed to complement the bank’s traditional SME services, aims to take online the work bank managers have long done in connecting businesses offline.

BizCrowd is open to all UK businesses, is free to join and use, and is designed to encourage collaboration between British SMEs. The website helps SMEs build their online profile and generate new business leads, as well as acting as a resource for customers looking for trusted suppliers. Suppliers are not vetted by the site.

RBS and NatWest describe Bizcrowd as “a true peer-to-peer business community”, complete with feedback mechanism, which allows registered suppliers to be rated and recommended by customers in the community. Around 20 law firms have already signed up, including well-known personal injury specialists Pattinson & Brewer, multi-office home counties firm Noble Solicitors and virtual firm Excello.

Steve Arundale, head of professionals at NatWest and RBS, said: “It has always been the role of the bank manager to connect British businesses to one another, now we’re extending that support online. We hope Bizcrowd helps as many firms as possible raise their profile and win new business.”

To register, click here.

 



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