Another unregulated adviser sentenced for providing immigration services

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12 August 2015


McCarthy: clear message

McCarthy: clear message

A Birmingham man who provided unregulated immigration advice has become the latest operator in the sector to be convicted for his actions.

Rais Nawaz Malik, 40, of Remedy Legal, Dudley Road, Birmingham, pleaded guilty at Birmingham Magistrates’ Court to two charges of providing unregulated immigration advice or services since May 2013.

He was sentenced to a community order for 24 weeks, concurrent for each offence, and made subject to a curfew between 8pm and 6am, with an electronic tag fitted, also for 24 weeks. He was further ordered to pay compensation of £4,400 within 14 days, for which a collection order was made.

On sentencing, District Judge Crane said: “You have minimised the seriousness of what you have done. You weren’t authorised and you misled your clients.”

Immigration Services Commissioner Suzanne McCarthy said: “Mr Malik chose to operate outside the law, and without regard for the protection of his clients. I am delighted with the outcome of this case, and I hope it sends a clear message to other people considering providing immigration advice – act within the law or you will find yourself in court.”

Last month, a man who falsely claimed to be a solicitor was jailed for 15 months after being guilty of providing unregulated immigration advice and services, while another who was actually a bus driver was handed a suspended sentence.

In May, an immigration solicitor who continued to practise despite being suspended was given a suspended prison sentence also for providing unregulated immigration advice.

Immigration is the only area of legal practice outside of the reserved legal activities where those involved need to be regulated.



One Response to “Another unregulated adviser sentenced for providing immigration services”

  1. I can’t help thinking that in this and the earlier cases you have reported, the sentencing remarks were robust, but the actual sentences were lenient and would not send the appropriate message to any who might be tempted to offer unregulated advice.

  2. Geoffrey Negus on August 12th, 2015 at 9:32 pm

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