Walker Smith Way Legal in SOS Connect roll-out

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30 April 2014


Progressive law firm Walker Smith Way Legal has gone live with SOS Connect legal software from (SOS) for integrated practice and case management across its nine offices.

A full service practice based in Chester, Walker Smith Way Legal has a further eight offices nationwide. Its client base includes private individuals, trades union members and businesses.

Last year the firm acquired Preston-based MWR Solicitors, taking its staff numbers to 154, including 22 partners.

Managing partner Neil Turnbull said the firm had now gone live with the full complement of SOS Connect’s practice and case management, CRM and marketing functionalities.

“Walker Smith Way Legal is a long-established firm and we are proud of our heritage and the generations of clients which we have advised,” he said.

“This is complemented by our modern and progressive approach towards client service excellence and a client care approach, which extends into every area of the practice, including IT.

“A key driver for our switch to SOS Connect was its ability to integrate with the personal injury claims portal, its ability to provide integrated private client services, third party sites and other key client ID and money laundering sites. 

“Our existing system not only lacked the ability to integrate with these third party sites, it also lacked any Legal Aid functionality, which necessitated extra manual work for the firm.”

David McNamara, managing director of SOS, said: “Walker Smith Way Legal’s migration to SOS Connect will allow the firm’s systems to integrate all the components it requires to achieve a fully streamlined and efficient operation. This will stand the firm in good stead as it embarks on its next phase of its growth.”



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