Virtual Practices supports continued growth at EC3\Legal

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15 September 2014


Jennings says Virtual Practices is ‘an attractive option for growing new law firms’

The Virtual Practices (VP) hosted legal software and outsourced cashiering service is proving crucial to the continued growth of EC3\Legal two years on from the firm’s launch.

Set up in 2012, EC3\Legal advises on a range of employment, regulation and compliance, property, commercial and corporate law, with offices in London and Chelmsford.

Practice manager Gisele Coupe says the firm went live with VP later that year.

“We launched primarily as a firm specialising in M&A but it soon became apparent that our clients wanted a lot more ‘wrap around’ care and support, therefore over the past two years, in a very targeted way, we have been adding other practice areas,” she says.

“We knew from the outset that we didn’t want or need to incur the expense of bespoke software and that we’d require support when it came to things like training and being compliant with SRA regulations.

“We opted for Virtual Practices in the belief that we’d only use it for the legal cashiering service, but soon we also began to utilise it for our matter management.

“The great thing with VP is that it can grow with the firm and it’s very easy to add users as you go along. The VP team, and Natalie Jennings in particular, have been very helpful and precise in the way they have supported us through this process.”

Natalie Jennings, who heads up Virtual Practices, which is a division of legal software supplier , said: “Many of Virtual Practice’s attributes make it an attractive option for growing new law firms such as EC3\Legal.

“As the firm continues to grow in the coming years, Virtual Practices can adapt and grow with it.”

 



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