University of Law signs up to Riliance

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29 August 2014


Gidge: Riliance will deliver long term benefit to the university and to the profession as they progress in the sector

The University of Law is the latest organisation to sign up to Riliance’s market-leading risk and compliance software. The cloud-based system will be used within the University’s Legal Advice Centre.

The Legal Advice Centre runs a trainee litigation programme which provides legal advice to clients, mainly in immigration and housing, and provides training for approximately 450 trainee solicitors a year who spend a week in the centre as part of a two week litigation programme at the university.

Emma Douglas, who manages the trainee litigation programme said:

“I first saw Riliance at this year’s Law Society’s Annual Risk and Compliance Conference and quickly realised it was the right tool to help me manage our compliance obligations. The University of Law joins over 1100 organisations that have signed up to Riliance.”

Mark Gidge, chief executive at Riliance said:

“We are extremely pleased to welcome the University of Law to Riliance and look forward to working with them.

“We have worked with The University of Law to ensure they can integrate an effective risk and compliance system. The fact that the universities trainee solicitors will see the system in action and recognise the importance of putting in place appropriate systems to manage this critical area of legal practice will deliver long term benefit to the university and to the profession as they progress in the sector.”

 



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