Three years running: Team SOS takes on Bath Half for Prince’s Trust

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25 March 2013


For the third consecutive year, runners from Solicitors Own Software Ltd. (SOS) have taken part in the Bath Half marathon to support the company’s chosen charity, the Prince’s Trust. Team SOS have now raised £4,200 for the Trust, a ‘youth charity that helps change young lives’.

In March 2013, Team SOS joined over 11,000 runners who took part in the 21km race, won by the Ethiopian Tewodros Shiferaw in 1 hour 3 minutes and 26 seconds.

Client Account Manager, Douglas Convery (placed 2727), who has completed the Bath Half four times, and achieved a personal best time of 1 hour 45 minutes and 41 seconds comments: “Every year I swear I won’t do it again but then I find myself being lured back by the challenge! If you’re keen to do a half marathon, Bath is a fast, flat, scenic course with lots of support on the way around.”

David McNamara, Managing Director of SOS adds: “This activity helps us to embody one of our corporate vales of being a supportive organisation. Including what our runners achieved in the previous two years, we are delighted that we’ve been able to collectively donate nearly £4,200 to such a worthwhile cause.”

Scripting consultant, Adam Jobling, also took part as did Richard Handy, Project Manager. In total, ten employees from SOS have run the Bath Half for the Prince’s Trust since 2010.

If you would like to support Team SOS, there is still time – here is our JustGiving page

Read about Team SOS 2012 here and discover more about the Prince’s Trust here.

 



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