Specialist private client practice chooses Proclaim

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21 October 2013


Christchurch-based law firm, Williams Thompson Solicitors LLP, is implementing Eclipse‘s Software solution.

Stephen Bowden, Partner at Williams Thompson, comments:

“This is major investment in the future for our firm.  It reflects the confidence we have in our business and our recognition as to how essential it is to ensure that we continue to provide an exceptional quality of service to our clients.  Having investigated the market widely, we came to the firm conclusion that Eclipse’s Proclaim software was best placed to enable us to take full advantage of the latest IT developments available and will assist us in improving both our administration and our client services.  We are really looking forward to the benefits that we believe this investment will bring.”

Williams Thompson specialises in private-client legal services, specifically in the areas of property, family and probate.  The firm sought to replace its incumbent system with a solution that could provide new client service tools, cross-practice matter consistency and reporting.

Eclipse’s Proclaim system is being implemented as Williams Thompson’s core Practice Management solution.  Dedicated Matter Management casetypes in conveyancing, family and probate are being introduced, as well as a bespoke casetype solution to cater for non-standard work areas.  The integrated will provide firm-wide financial management, while Proclaim’s Credit Control Centre will ensure tight management of client payments.  As part of the implementation, Eclipse is carrying out a migration of data from the incumbent financial system.

Williams Thompson is also taking the and Compliance toolsets to provide seamless client inception processes, with ongoing adherence to SRA regulations.

 



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